OIL AND GAS/HSE EMPLOYMENT TRAINING-ROUSTABOUTS





INTRODUCTION

WHO ARE ROUSTABOUTS?
1.     They are considered as skill apprentices in a literal language.
2.     Roustabouts are often called the oil and gas career new babes
THE ROUSTABOUT
ü It’s the entering level into the oil and gas career.

WORK NATURE
1.     Roustabouts are helpers in the oil and gas stand.
2.     It’s basically masculine manly because sometimes it’s tasking and require enough strength to work.
WHO DO THEY HELP?
1.     The radio operator’s
2.     The drillers
3.     The riggers
4.     The derrick men
5.     The roughnecks
6.     The Welders
7.     The foremen
8.     The filters
WHAT DO THEY HELP WITH?
1.     Painting
2.     Lifting, Carrying tools and equipments
3.     Cleaning Spills and general housekeeping
4.     Control Cranes (in special occasions)
5.     Loading and unloading
6.     Safety Monitoring
7.     Equipment Washing, Oiling and Maintaining
8.     Assisting the drillers
ROUSTABOUT AN ENTRY LEVEL
1.     It’s not a profession.
2.     It’s a short term position however it requires the employee to have learnt any special skill before he or she is to be promoted.
3.      In most cases candidates are required to possess required certification before being employed.

ROUSTABOUT QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENT
1.     Special Certification in Roustabout.
2.     Knowledge and certification in Housekeeping.
3.     Knowledge and certification in manual Handling.
4.     Certification in Confine space safety
MANUAL HANDLING
Any activity required of a person to use any part of their muscular or skeletal system in their interactions with their work environment.
NOTE: Because the roustabout personnel’s are always involved with manual tasks, then it’s important to know how to do manual handling correctly.



1.     CARRYING
When is carrying done wrongly?
ü When it has heavy impact on the carrier’s muscles or skeletal system.

When is carrying done correctly?
ü When a machine is use to carry load instead.
ü When a lighter load is carried or when more hands are added.

2.     LIFTING
When is Lifting done wrongly?
ü When the lifter bends to use his skeletal system.
 Note: the danger is doing lifting wrongly is fracture or dislocation to any of the skeletal parts.
When is Lifting done Correctly?
ü When the lifter squats with his back erect and his knees bend as show in picture above.
3.     STRIKING
When is Striking done wrongly?
ü When it has heavy impact on the strikers muscles or skeletal system and when it’s done for long time.

When is Striking done Correctly?
ü When its done lightly and in a short period of time.
ü When you engage the use of the right machines.



4.     PUSHING
When is Pushing done wrongly?
ü When the pusher’s skeletal system is involved and or when the pusher’s involves too much of his muscles.
When is Pushing done Correctly?
ü When it’s done lightly and or the pusher engages the right machines to push to his destination.
Note:
ü Wrong handling of manual task leads to MSD (musculoskeletal disorder) injuries.
ü Poor manual handlings contribute to 30% of workplace injuries.
Examples of MSD
1.     Strains of ligaments
2.     Strains of muscles or tendons
3.     Injuries to the spine, joints, bones or nerves
4.     Abdominal hernias.
WARNING
70% of the roustabout’s work involves manual handling, its highly advisable that intending candidate take it open himself to do manual tasks in the right way.
More so, right Manual handling is what recruiters want to watch out for.
CHAPTER ONE
 
THE ROUSTABOUT AND THE CRANE

TYPES OF CRANE
1.     MOBILE
2.     HYDROULIC
3.     OVERHEAD
4.     GANTRY
5.     TOWER
OFFSHORE CRANES
MOBILE MOUNTED CRANE
WORKSHOP OVERHEAD CRANE

CRANE BOOM
An inclined spar, strut, or other long member supports the hoisting tackle.
CRANE HOIST
Used in Lifting and lowering of load.

Note:
No thought, Cranes help correct lots of manual handling problems but cranes   themselves can be dangerous if proper safety precautions are not apply.
MAJOR SAFETY ISSUES WITH CRANES
1.     Contact with power lines
2.     Over Turns
3.     Falls
4.     Mechanical failures
5.     Boom collapse
6.     Load Drops
HOW DO ACCIDENTS OCCUR
1.     INSTABILITY: unsecured load, load capacity exceeded, or ground not level or too soft.

2.     LACK OF COMMUNICATION: the point of operation is a distance from the crane operator or not in full view of the operator.

3.     LACK OF TRAINING

4.     INADEQUATE MAINTENANCE OR INSPECTION
SOLUTIONS
PLAINING BEFORE STARTUP
1.     Level the crane and ensure support surface is firm and able to support the load.
2.     Know the basic crane capacities, limitations, and job site restrictions, such as the location of power lines, unstable soil, or high winds.
3.     Make other personnel aware of hoisting activities.
4.     Barricade areas within swing radius.
5.     Ensure proper maintenance and inspections.
SAFETY TIPS
1.     POWER LINES
Stay Clear of Power lines.
2.     USE LADDER
Use ladders to get to the upper portion of the cab.
3.     DON’T STAND UNDER SUSPENDED LOADS.

CRANE INSPECTION
What to inspect
1.     Correct air pressure and no leaks
2.     Tires properly inflated
3.     Clearance for tail swing
4.     Wire rope wear
5.     Physical damage to crane
6.     Loose or missing hardware, nuts, or bolts
7.     Fluid leaks

STANDARD HAND SIGNAL
STANDARD CRANE HAND SIGNAL
Standard crane hand signal
1.     Signaling and  effectively communicating with the crane operators is almost an everyday routine for the roustabout personnel, we can’t over emphasis how important sign-communication is in a very noisy working environment most especially for heavy equipment operators.
2.     Seeing how important unify communication is, world regulatory body ANSI came up with  standards for hand signals for crane operators and  those who wants to communicate with them.
TO SIGNAL A CRANE
The signalperson (Roustabout) assigned to the crane shall:
1.     Be positioned in full view of the operator and if using hand signals close enough for the signals to be seen clearly.  The signal persons position must give him/her a full view of the load and equipment at all times without creating a hazard of being struck by the crane and/or load.
2.     Responsible for the public and all (unauthorized personnel outside of the crane’s operating radius).
3.     Be in constant communication with the operator at all times with either the standard hand signals as required in accordance with ANSI B30.5 or by direct radio communication.
4.     Direct the load so that it never passes over anyone.
5.     It is recommended that the signalperson wear highly visible gloves (day-glow orange, yellow or white) to distinguish him/herself from other personnel and make the signals clearer.
Source:www.deslogenergy.com

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